Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies
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Acceptance rate18%
Submission to final decision63 days
Acceptance to publication20 days
CiteScore14.400
Journal Citation Indicator2.700
Impact Factor10.3

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 Journal profile

Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies is an interdisciplinary journal publishing high-impact research that advances the understanding of complex interactions between diverse human behavior and emerging digital technologies.

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Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Protective and Risk Parenting Styles for Internet and Online Gambling Addiction

This study analyzes the relationship of the four parenting styles, authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful, with Internet addiction and online gambling addiction. Study sample was 512 adolescents aged between 16 and 21 years (63.9% females, , ). A 4 × 2 × 2 MANOVA was applied for the outcome variables of Internet addiction (loss of control, emotional need and dependence) and gambling (anticipation, desire, and relief) with parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful), sex (boy vs. girls), and age (16-18 years old vs. 19-21 years old) as independent variables. The results provide evidence of the relationship between parenting styles and technological addictions, showing that parenting characterized by the use of practices of involvement and acceptance (authoritative and indulgent parenting) can act as protective factors for Internet addiction and online gambling addiction. On the contrary, authoritarian parenting, characterized by the use of strictness and imposition practices, would act as a risk factor for Internet addiction and online gambling addiction. The protective and risk effects of parenting styles over adolescents’ technological addictions take place irrespective of their sex and age.

Research Article

The Impact of Smartphone and Social Media Use on Adolescent Sleep Quality and Mental Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Objective. Social media (SM) has gained almost ubiquitous use in society and especially among adolescents; however, there has been rising concern over its negative consequences, including the effects on child behavioral health, such as sleep and internalizing symptoms. Research elucidating the impacts of SM use on young people should be conducted to inform healthier SM usage. This study seeks to understand how SM use and use of phones around bedtime associates with worse sleep quality, depression, and anxiety among youth during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing. Methods. This project uses archival data collected in fall 2020 through school-based surveys to adolescents in a rural school district in Michigan. There were a total of 200 participants (91.7% response rate) of which 180 adolescents (12-15 years old, 40.0% male, 55.6% female, 3.9% nonbinary) were included in the analysis based on their SM use, the majority of whom identified as white (91.7%). Results. Linear regression analyses indicated that higher self-reported SM use was associated with poorer sleep quality and greater depression (). Sleep quality mediated the association between SM use and depression (). Furthermore, youth who brought their smartphones to bed with them had poorer sleep quality than those without phones (). SM use was not associated with anxiety after controlling for age and gender. Conclusions. SM use is associated with higher rates of adolescent depression; however, sleep appears to mediate the relationship. The impacts of bringing a smartphone to bed and self-reported SM use on adolescent mental health may be better predicted via sleep disruption even during a widescale event such as COVID-19.

Research Article

The Evolution of Polarization in Online Conversation: Twitter Users’ Opinions about the COVID-19 Pandemic Become More Politicized over Time

Political polarization on social media has been extensively studied. However, most research has examined polarization about topics that have preexisting associations with ideology, while few studies have tracked the onset of polarization about novel topics or the evolution of polarization over a prolonged period. The occurrence of COVID-19 provides a unique opportunity to study whether social media discourse about a novel event becomes increasingly polarized along ideological lines over time. This paper analyzes trends in Twitter polarization in relation to COVID-19 and other geopolitical events of 2020. The first two studies use topic analysis to examine the evolving difference over time in discussions of COVID-19 and other topics by liberals and conservatives on social media. COVID-19-related polarization is initially absent but gradually increases over time, in contrast to polarization related to other events. A third study examines structural polarization in retweet networks and finds that the frequency of counterpartisan retweets reduces over time. Across all three studies, we find evidence that Twitter discussion of COVID-19 has become more polarized over time.

Research Article

Factors Influencing Adoption of IoT and Its Impact on CRM in Banks: Examining the Moderating Role of Gender, Age, and Bank Ownership Type

Internet is becoming a part of our lifestyle; however, the usage rate and application of the Internet are disparate in different parts of the world. In many emerging countries, the Internet is yet to penetrate ordinary households. The present study focuses on how IoT adoption impacts the banks’ customer relationship management (CRM) in an emerging market context. Furthermore, the moderating roles of gender, age, and bank ownership type on the relationship between the adoption of IoT and CRM have also been tested. Cost, convenience, social context, and privacy were studied as the predicting variables of IoT adoption, while IoT adoption was investigated as the antecedent of CRM. The CRM variable has been operationalized as a second-order latent construct consisting of three first-order latent variables: responsiveness, satisfaction, and assurance. A cross-sectional, non-probability-based survey was conducted from 467 bank customers of three public and three private sector banks in Aligarh city of India. Two CFA models were run to ensure reliability, validity, and model fit. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) on AMOS software, while PROCESS Macro v4.0 by Hayes (2009) was used to test the moderating effect of gender on the relationship between IoT adoption and CRM. The results indicate that cost, convenience, social context, and privacy are positively influencing IoT adoption, which in turn positively affects CRM. Gender and age were found to have a negative moderation effect on the path between IoT adoption and CRM, while bank ownership type positively moderated this link.

Research Article

Testing the Ability of Teachers and Students to Differentiate between Essays Generated by ChatGPT and High School Students

The release of ChatGPT in late 2022 prompted widespread concern about the implications of artificial intelligence for academic integrity, but thus far there has been little direct empirical evidence to inform this debate. Participants (69 high school teachers, 140 high school students, total ) took an AI Identification Test in which they read pairs of essays—one written by a high school student and the other by ChatGPT—and guessed which was generated by the chatbot. Accuracy was only 70% for teachers, and it was slightly worse for students (62%). Self-reported confidence did not predict accuracy, nor did experience with ChatGPT or subject-matter expertise. Well-written student essays were especially hard to differentiate from the ChatGPT texts. In another set of measures, students reported greater optimism than their teachers did about the future role of ChatGPT in education. Students expressed disapproval of submitting ChatGPT-generated essays as one’s own but rated this and other possible academic integrity violations involving ChatGPT less negatively than teachers did. These results form an empirical basis for further work on the relationship between AI and academic integrity.

Research Article

An Integrated Framework Approach to Understanding Vietnamese People’s Intention to Adopt Smart Home Solutions

In recent years, although smart homes and smart home solutions have been widely accepted in developed regions (such as Europe, the United States, and Japan), their application in emerging countries (such as Vietnam) remains limited. This study is aimed at assessing the factors influencing Vietnamese people’s intention to adopt smart home solutions based on the integration of the technology acceptance model and innovation diffusion theory. The study collected quantitative data from a survey of 310 participants in Vietnam and analyzed them using structural equation modelling with AMOS software. This study’s findings show that compatibility and perceived usefulness play important roles in promoting users’ intention to adopt smart home solutions. This study has practical implications for businesses in Vietnam and provides useful recommendations for future research.

Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate18%
Submission to final decision63 days
Acceptance to publication20 days
CiteScore14.400
Journal Citation Indicator2.700
Impact Factor10.3
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.